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was finally put in place by the f.b.i. after so-called underwear bomber tried to blow up the airplane in which he was traveling as it flew over detroit on christmas day, 2009. and was advise of his mir and da rights. the c.i.a. interrogation program that might have handleled the interview had by then been dismantled by president obama. at the behest of such muslim brotherhood affiliated groups as the council on american islamic relations, and the islamic society of north america, and other self-proclaimed spokesmen for merican muslim, the f.b.i. has battlerized its train materials. does this delicacy infect the f.b.i.'s interrogation group as well? will we see another performance like the army's after-action report following major d.a. nidal hasan's rampage at fort hood in 2009, proceeded by his report alahu akbar, a that spoke nothing of militant islam, but referred to the incident as workplace violence. if tone is set at the top, recall that the army chief of staff at the time said the most tragic result of fort hood would be if it interfered with he army's diversity program. presumably the
adjudicated mentally ill by the state of virginia. but those records were never transmitted to the f.b.i. to be included in a background check. and we know that the shooter in tucson fail a drug test -- failed a drug test, a disqualifying fact for somebody to be able to legally purchase firearms given a background check, but that information was never transmitted to the f.b.i., and so the few son shooter was not -- and so the tucson shooter was not prevented from buying weapons, even though he should have been disqualified if the background check system had been working the way it should. i believe the most appropriate response to the recent mass shootings tshootings is to maket our current laws involving mental illness, drug use, mental health adjudications are enforced more aggressively and more efficiently. but, at the same time, while we're trying to find a solution to these problems and not just engage in meaningless symbolism, we should not be making it harder for law-abiding citizens to exercise their constitutional rights under the second amendment. we can and we should embrace r
, including f.b.i. director muller, attorney general holder, secretary napolitano, and my counterterrorism and homeland security advisor, lisa monaco, on the attacks in boston. we continue to mobilize and deploy all appropriate law enforcement resources to protect our citizens and investigate and to respond to this attack. obviously our first thoughts this morning are with the victims. their families and the city of boston. explosionst two gravely wounded dozens of americans and took the lives of others, including a 8-year-old boy. this was a heinous and cowardly act and given what we now know about what took place, the f.b.i.'s investigating it as an act of terrorism. any time bombs are used to target innocent civilians, it is an act of terror. what we don't yet know, however, is who carried out this attack or why, whether it was planned and executed by a terrorist organization, foreign or domestic, or was the act of a malevolent individual. that's what we don't yet know. and clearly we're at the beginning of our investigation. it will take time to follow every lead and determine what hap
said the f.b.i. is investigating this as an act of terrorism and the full force of the federal government will support the response and the federal investigation. there is no current evidence that the attack was part of a broader plot. but out of caution, we don't to keep in place enhanced security measures seen and unseen with coordination of state and local partners. we urge the american people to remain vigil legend and report any signs of suspicious activity to local law enforcement. we thank the people of boston for their response. we stand in solidarity with them and with everyone who has been making sure that the response, the recovery, and the investigation continue full force. beyond that, mr. chairman, i should not say anything in an unclassified setting except to reassure the committee that d.h.s. is put in full force into providing the f.b.i. with any and all assistance it requires in addition doing a number of other things with the city of boston. >> thank you. >> as you know, this year marks the 10th anniversary of the d.h.s., the largest creation of federal gover
response? >> i think that the response in both state, federal and local as well as our f.b.i. involvement is certainly adequate and i hope that they will be able to ascertain who perpetrated this. as far as i can tell, they are doing everything's that is needed to be done. >> is there an indication there is a foreign-involved -- >> i do not know. >> what are the sticking points you had to resolve? how difficult was it to resolve them and the 2007 bill fell apart over amnesty and future flow. how is this different? >> first, we pretty much resolved the major issues about a week and a half ago, i guess this past friday, agriculture finally came together and that was the last major sticking point. obviously when business and labor got on the phone good friday evening and agreed on a piece of paper that we had sent them, that was a big major change, too. the answers to both of the questions that we have business and labor on board. that was not true in 2007. in fact, labor was actively trying to scuttle the bill. and john, correct me if i'm wrong, not only are business and labor on board and
that the f.b.i. maintains, depends on the states sending information to the f.b.i. that they could use to screen out gun buyers. as a matter of fact, the shooter at the virginia tech had been adjudicated mentally ill by the state of virginia, but that information was never forwarded to the f.b.i. to be used on a background check. so he could therefore purchase weapons without a hit occurring on the nics background check system. after 2008, we passed legislation encourage the states, trying to incentivize them to send the information to the f.b.i. so that wouldn't happen again. and we know from the general accountability of course, the g.a.o., that the report of compliance with that law is dismal indeed. many states just simply haven't done it. i believe there are things we can do to further incentivize the states to send that information so that the background check system maintained by the f.b.i. actually works to preclude shooters like the virginia tech shooter from legally buying weapons because there would be a hit on the background check system, and he would be stopped from that s
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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